Since we are doing videos...here's one of mine

Discussion on Advanced and Defensive Driving. IAM, RoSPA/RoADA, High Performance Course. All associated training. Car training.

Postby stefan einz » Tue Apr 24, 2012 11:04 pm


A short demo drive in a 911 Carrera Club Sport. No commentary, but hopefully some evidence of a system of car control at work.

The car does not have power steering, so I use three different steering techniques in the video - fixed grip, pre-steering (for tighter turns), and pull push.

Note that the camera (GoPro) is set to a very wide angle which increases the sensation of speed. This was a drive wholly within the NSL.

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Ew8DfRu5 ... hwGxFXY%3D

Cheers
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Postby Mr Cholmondeley-Warner » Wed Apr 25, 2012 12:13 am


Very nice Steve. Restrained and very smooth. Just slightly more other traffic would have added some contrast and a benchmark for the speed. I'm guessing this was very early in the morning, though.
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Postby jcochrane » Wed Apr 25, 2012 9:27 am


A fine example of driving excellence. Safe, smooth, calm and delicate control. With a great sense of flow and rhythm. Thanks for putting this up Steve. That club sport of yours is a delight to drive. :D
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Postby ROG » Wed Apr 25, 2012 10:45 am


stefan einz wrote:A short demo drive in a 911 Carrera Club Sport. No commentary, but hopefully some evidence of a system of car control at work.

The car does not have power steering, so I use three different steering techniques in the video - fixed grip, pre-steering (for tighter turns), and pull push.

Note that the camera (GoPro) is set to a very wide angle which increases the sensation of speed. This was a drive wholly within the NSL.



Cheers

A nice drive :D
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Postby somewhatfoolish » Wed Apr 25, 2012 2:46 pm


Concur - super smooth... slightly hard to judge speed though, parts felt considerably quicker than 60 to me - not that I have any problem with that at all - just mentioning it from the "dangerous hooligan sent away for life for vid of 85mph on M25" angle...

Also on the approach to the narrow bridge, not sure the horn would have reached anyone at a useful time (a nice touch might have been to wind yer window down approaching it so you could hear horns from the other direction) and indeed would you have been able to stop in time against a tank transproter coming the other way at 56? It seems like you wouldn't, but again this may be an artefact of the video... in fact on the occasional time it's impossible to have a clue what's going on at all. And the rain is a shame.

But what really inspires confidence is the view of you in the cockpit - calm, smooth, appropriate inputs to stearing wheel and gears... and you didn't even pick your nose once!
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Postby stefan einz » Wed Apr 25, 2012 3:21 pm


somewhatfoolish wrote:Concur - super smooth... slightly hard to judge speed though, parts felt considerably quicker than 60 to me - not that I have any problem with that at all - just mentioning it from the "dangerous hooligan sent away for life for vid of 85mph on M25" angle...

Also on the approach to the narrow bridge, not sure the horn would have reached anyone at a useful time (a nice touch might have been to wind yer window down approaching it so you could hear horns from the other direction) and indeed would you have been able to stop in time against a tank transproter coming the other way at 56? It seems like you wouldn't, but again this may be an artefact of the video... in fact on the occasional time it's impossible to have a clue what's going on at all. And the rain is a shame.

But what really inspires confidence is the view of you in the cockpit - calm, smooth, appropriate inputs to stearing wheel and gears... and you didn't even pick your nose once!


Thanks. On the speed you'll note I was using 2nd and 3rd mostly; I relaxed into 4th when hitting 60 mph. As I said in the intro, the wide angle (120 degrees) gives a view of the verges, and that is what makes the speed seem high. Try looking out the side of a car's window when it is travelling even at 40mph and you'll see what I mean!

Re the bridge, you actually can see quite early that the approach to it from the other side is a fairly sharp bend, so no-one will be coming through quickly; that said my speed over the bridge was probably no more than 20 mph, so easy to stop in a short distance even in the wet.

Re the horn warning, I think the timing was about right, early enough for someone to hear it before they committed to the bridge coming the other way. You make a good point though about lowering the window to hear a response - I could cope with getting the odd rain drop on me!

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Postby 7db » Wed Apr 25, 2012 5:07 pm


somewhatfoolish wrote:But what really inspires confidence is the view of you in the cockpit - calm, smooth, appropriate inputs to stearing wheel and gears... and you didn't even pick your nose once!


Steve has a very calmingly low work rate in the car. The epitome of this is Don Palmer who I could swear was actually asleep last time he slide me sideways at speeds approaching three figures. I was very much awake.
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Postby StressedDave » Thu Apr 26, 2012 2:09 pm


somewhatfoolish wrote:But what really inspires confidence is the view of you in the cockpit - calm, smooth, appropriate inputs to stearing wheel and gears... and you didn't even pick your nose once!

I'm just sorry that Steve didn't use the 'tea with the queen' steering method once. That's the one that is fixed grip with everything but the little fingers which are pointing at 90 degrees to the wheel...
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Postby jcochrane » Thu Apr 26, 2012 2:24 pm


StressedDave wrote:
somewhatfoolish wrote:But what really inspires confidence is the view of you in the cockpit - calm, smooth, appropriate inputs to stearing wheel and gears... and you didn't even pick your nose once!

I'm just sorry that Steve didn't use the 'tea with the queen' steering method once. That's the one that is fixed grip with everything but the little fingers which are pointing at 90 degrees to the wheel...


I sometimes do that as well. Always the left little pinky never the right. No idea why that should be. :?
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Postby StressedDave » Thu Apr 26, 2012 2:54 pm


As you know, I tend to take it to extremes, going more for 'Victorian Strangler' with just thumb and index finger on the wheel and the other three splayed out. No idea why you'd only want to single handedly do the 'Tea with the Queen'. I'm guessing you're right-handed though...
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Postby jcochrane » Thu Apr 26, 2012 3:07 pm


StressedDave wrote:As you know, I tend to take it to extremes, going more for 'Victorian Strangler' with just thumb and index finger on the wheel and the other three splayed out. No idea why you'd only want to single handedly do the 'Tea with the Queen'. I'm guessing you're right-handed though...

You're correct I'm right handed. But when doing "tea with the Queen" my only contact with my right hand on the wheel is with the tips of the fingers and thumb. Suppose that's a more extreme "Victorian Strangler". :lol:
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Postby Astraist » Thu Apr 26, 2012 9:57 pm


I liked the video, too! A good example of how a skilled driver can drive quite quickly without compromising their necessary safety margins, by practicing smoothness, accuracy and decisiveness and always planning well ahead in advance.

The fact the camera also allows to see technical aspects of driving like steering and shifting is also important; I always encourage track drivers I give input to to have their cameras situated to include these details, and even use a footcam. In my coaching mantra, it's the big picture that counts, but it's the little details that make the difference!

And as for your "tea with the queen" grip - it's a nice example of my mantra, and I have seen an advanced driving instructor practice it simply to illustrate to students the importance of a light steering grip.

Nevertheless, if I am allowed to add seriousness into what strikes me as a humorous debate, it's obvious that there is no need to intentionally give up on some of your contact with the wheel (particularly the sensitive finger-tips) where you don't need to.

I always tell drivers to keep their albows down and their wrists unbent as possible when turning. Of course, some steering mechanisms are heavier (e.g. the Porsche in the video) and require more upper body strength (and pull-push steering).

One last note, steve: The position of the additional interior mirror you use seems odd to me. I've found that placing it right besides the interior mirror obstructs my clear view and creates risk when airbags are involved, so I always put it higher, right at the top end.
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Postby stefan einz » Fri Apr 27, 2012 9:40 am


Astraist wrote:
And as for your "tea with the queen" grip - it's a nice example of my mantra, and I have seen an advanced driving instructor practice it simply to illustrate to students the importance of a light steering grip.

Nevertheless, if I am allowed to add seriousness into what strikes me as a humorous debate, it's obvious that there is no need to intentionally give up on some of your contact with the wheel (particularly the sensitive finger-tips) where you don't need to.

I always tell drivers to keep their albows down and their wrists unbent as possible when turning. Of course, some steering mechanisms are heavier (e.g. the Porsche in the video) and require more upper body strength (and pull-push steering).

One last note, steve: The position of the additional interior mirror you use seems odd to me. I've found that placing it right besides the interior mirror obstructs my clear view and creates risk when airbags are involved, so I always put it higher, right at the top end.


Thanks for the positive comments.

You have probably mistaken StressedDave's post for a serious one - he was actually gently taking the mickey out of me for this:

Image

It's a habit I've tried to break and I think I successfully avoided a repeat in the video!

Being serious for a moment, I do like to vary my grip on the steering wheel - keeping it light most of the time, only firming it up when appropriate (e.g. on bumpy roads or when cornering with a high g-force). One of the ways I do that is to occasionally flex my grip (as you can see in the video) - it's an unconscious habit now to just ensure I don't start over gripping the rim.

As for the rear view mirror, once again the GoPro wide angle deceives. You can see the second mirror is right alongside the standard mirror - it is for the passenger not the driver. It does not impinge of my view forward in any material way.

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Postby 7db » Fri Apr 27, 2012 10:01 am


I like to keep my grip lighter on the wheel than the tyres lateral grip on the road so that I can feel the wheel start to slip before I feel the car start to slip. This is a constant process of shuffling and readjustment, flexing, feeling and touching like an octopus with a fish.

Co-drivers hate it, I've noticed.
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Postby michael769 » Fri Apr 27, 2012 10:26 am


7db wrote:flexing, feeling and touching like an octopus with a fish.

Co-drivers hate it, I've noticed.


:shock:

I'm not surprised!
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